One Thousand Days

Consistency

Consistency (Photo credit: Matt Hampel)

 

There are 1,000 days between Dec 16, 2009 and September 10, 2012.

The reason I know that is because on Dec 16, 2009 I decided to run every day for the rest of my life. With God’s help and as a result of 7 lessons, I have now reached the 1,000th consecutive day of my goal.

Why do this? What is the motive? Why does it matter to others in my circle of influence?

The Motive

The motive is to lead by example. I am a doctor interested in preventing disease rather than treating troubles which should never have been troubles to begin with.

I am also an athlete and one who uses endurance sport (marathon running) as a tool to be consistent with nutrition, sleep and exercise. I value good health. Thus the commitment to focus on it daily–as opposed for a season.

I will be publishing my first book soon. It will deal with being consistent. In consistency lies the power—whatever the area may be in which you want to grow and succeed. To write this book I had to match my words and actions.

The Method

  1. Find out what works for you; have fun doing it; don’t quit. For example, 99% of my runs took place early in the day before other things got in my way.
  2. Check the ABC’s of meaningful living: Attitudes, Beliefs and Choices. Do it deliberately. Do it intentionally. Do it daily.  What you focus on you will attract.

Being consistent in running has helped me to be more consistent in my faith development. I am inspired by Christ who taught me 10 words that impacted me deeply: According to your faith it will be done unto you.

It is not so much the idea of running every day as how it shapes other areas of living. As I developed my endurance physically I also listened to my iPod, developing my faith muscles.

  1. I long ago decided to run my own race. Critics were there along the way in great numbers. Some were even close acquaintances. Some were jealous. Some were distracted or unsuccessful while I stayed focused on being consistent.

Here are some things that were said to me (I ignored them all and ran my own race)

“You will damage your body” or “Just wait….soon you will be injured”

                “You ran every day and I ate everyday; I had more fun”

                “You ought to do other things to prevent boredom. You cannot run every day”

“And you are doing this…..why?”  Or “No comment” (Translated? “You are nuts but I will not say that)

You must have had some days where you hardly ran (The truth is I averaged 60 to 90 kms per week and at least a mile for the shortest run)

Why it Matters

The main reason is not only to set a good example but also to have credibility; to walk the talk. Few patients respect doctors who say one thing and then do the opposite.

Consistency causes:

—Personal development

Healthy habits (many days I did not have to plan my runs; it became second nature; it is who I am; it is what I do; it is like eating and brushing one’s teeth….a daily habit which is not on the to-do-list anymore)

—A mindset of discipline.  Life is really a string of obstacles. Almost every day we must overcome obstacles.  To be an overcomer, discipline is crucial.

—Fresh vitality as a result of attaining daily goals.

The Seven Lessons:

  1. Making a commitment to something you value is the first step toward a successful endeavor.
  2. Being consistent in one area, results in personal growth and vitality in other areas.
  3. Learning from the right people brings out your best. The company you keep matters much.
  4. Distractions dilute discipline. Distractions are numerous and inevitable. Plan ahead to defeat them.
  5. Focusing on the journey more than the destination, brings satisfaction and joy.
  6. Run your own race. Ignore the well-meaning comments from those who feel the need to judge you. Stay true to what really matters to you.
  7. Live life in such a way that whether you fail or succeed depends primarily on you and you alone.  I once saw a book with the title: If it is going to be it is up to me.

What about you…….. Does a 1, 000 day journey matter to you?

I encourage you to stop and consider one area in your life that matters a lot to you. Do you value it? Is it 7 out of 10 or a 10 out of 10 in its importance?

Go for the 10/10!

Check your attitudes, beliefs and choices in this one area. Can you do better?

Then go ahead and do it; have fun; stay steady and in 1,000 days you too can share how consistency paid off for you. It will inspire many, starting with those closest to you.

Carpe Diem.

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2012-09-10T13:59:54+00:00 September 10th, 2012|Inspirational|

One Comment

  1. Grant Molyneux Dec 20 at 10:50 pm - Reply

    Excellent information, practical and useful right away!

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