WHAT POLITICS CAN TEACH US

As a life coach, marathon runner, doctor, author and human being, I have observed some of the recent events in US politics.

They say it’s not a good idea to talk about religion, sex and politics. In this blog I will ignore that advice. Seven is said to be perfect the perfect number, so here are seven lessons which the political process taught me about moving forward.

These life lessons and musings were inspired by what I observed the past 12 months during the Election process of the President of the USA— a human who holds a very influential position. (Even Canadians who are fond of accusing the USA of being ego-centric, had to reluctantly admit this office is the most powerful office on the planet. This was in the context of a time when the majority of Canadians fretted over a Trump victory)

  1. Do not always trust so-called experts. I was awake most of the election night and read the New York. Here are some headlines from the NYT:

—Story of a lifetime missed by media.

—Shocking upset.

—Media, once again misreads complex pulse of USA.

—Boiling anger missed.

—Pollsters failed to foresee

—Media out of touch with reality.

—The night data died. Journalism broken.

—Dewey defeats Truman; lesson for digital age.

—Mainstream media blinded by bigotry.

—It turns out we were wrong.

 

  1. After a democratic country votes…… accept the results with grace. This is exactly what Hillary Clinton did. She did not make excuses or blamed. She did not attack or judge. Instead she quoted Scriptures by saying, “Let’s not get weary of well-doing.” In other words, she may have lost, but she did not lose her dream of doing what she thinks is the ideal way to carry on.
  2. There are still some public servants who “get it”: When I taught the Dale Carnegie Course, we taught students how to disagree without being disagreeable. In other words, I saw during this recent election some politicians who respected their opponents, while being very clear that they disagreed with the policies. It does not have to be the end of civil decorum. Most people are sincere and passionately believe that their ideas are the best for the country they love so much. That is fine in a democracy. It is not fine to attack, denounce, judge, vilify, condemn fellow humans, created by the same Source, when they have different opinions.
  3. Unless 100% of the population votes, we will always argue if the winner truly has a mandate. So the bigger question is why some people fail to cast their vote when they have the right—or opportunity—to vote.
  4. Mistakes are errors to be corrected. We all make mistakes. The big question is if we will be humble enough to learn from those mistakes and correct our own errors?
  5. Nobody likes it when others try to write their script. My teenagers taught me that when I tell them what to do or how to think, I offend them. Although I may a million reasons to think I am experienced —and thus “blessed” with the right opinion— it does not matter. Telling others that they are idiots because they do not think like you, is simply wrong and that which is wrong never ends up right. It can be offensive when we think we have a monopoly on opinions and solutions.
  6. Politics seem to be ego-driven for the most part. The only anti-dote I know for this is to apply more spirituality. One word may capture all forms of true spirituality: Love.

Scriptures teach us that love is patient, kind, not envious or jealous, not proud or boastful, not arrogant or rude, not selfish, not easily offended, not resentful, not glad when others fail; love overlooks faults and believes the best, exercises faith, endures without limits and hopes under all circumstances.

How may this blog then serve you and add value? If only one of these ideas serve you, pause and reflect. See how it may help you become the person you were meant to be when a Life Force put your first heart beat in you. We all are here to be truly helpful, and to do that, we all get to decide how our own individualized curriculums will help us grow and contribute to our culture. I cannot write the script for you. I can only show you the doors through which you alone will decide to enter—or not.

 

Peace.

 

Peter